world is beautiful . net
world is beautiful . net

Lake Superior photograph by G. McDougall Canada

Lake Superior
a beautiful photograph by

G. McDougall

Country : Canada
Area : Lake Superior

This photo was taken at sunset on the shore of Lake Superior at Chippewa Park in our city. Lake Superior rarely freezes completely, but the bays and inlets do freeze. Early in the winter the ice will often break up several times before it is thick enough to endure the storms. Camera: Fujifilm X-T2 with XF14mmF2.8 R.

License and usage policy

All photographs hosted on servers are copyright by the original authors of that content. It is licensed only for personal use on computers, cellular phones, and other personal electronic devices. All other uses (whether or not for profit) including redistribution (with or without modification of the original work) is strictly prohibited by law without additional written permission by the copyright holder.

Lake Superior

Lake Superior (French: Lac Supérieur; Ojibwe: ᑭᑦᒉᐁ-ᑲᒣᐁ, Gitchi-Gami) is the largest of the Great Lakes of North America. The lake is shared by the Canadian province of Ontario to the north, the U.S. state of Minnesota to the west, and Wisconsin and the Upper Peninsula of Michigan to the south. It is generally considered the largest freshwater lake in the world by surface area. It is the world's third-largest freshwater lake by volume and the largest by volume in North America.[6] The furthest north and west of the Great Lakes chain, Superior has the highest elevation of all five great lakes and drains into the St. Mary's River.

The Ojibwe name for the lake is gichi-gami (pronounced as gitchi-gami and kitchi-gami in other dialects),[7] meaning "great sea." Henry Wadsworth Longfellow wrote the name as "Gitche Gumee" in The Song of Hiawatha, as did Gordon Lightfoot in his song, "The Wreck of the Edmund Fitzgerald". According to other sources, the actual Ojibwe name is Ojibwe Gichigami ("Ojibwe's Great Sea") or Anishinaabe Gichigami ("Anishinaabe's Great Sea").[8] The 1878 dictionary by Father Frederic Baraga, the first one written for the Ojibway language, gives the Ojibwe name as Otchipwe-kitchi-gami (reflecting Ojibwe Gichigami).[7]

The first French explorers approaching the great inland sea by way of the Ottawa River and Lake Huron during the 17th century referred to their discovery as le lac supérieur. Properly translated, the expression means "Upper Lake," that is, the lake above Lake Huron. The lake was also called Lac Tracy (named for Alexandre de Prouville de Tracy) by 17th century Jesuit missionaries.[9] The British, upon taking control of the region from the French in the 1760s following the French and Indian War, anglicized the lake's name to Superior, "on account of its being superior in magnitude to any of the lakes on that vast continent."[10]