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Great Tsingy photograph by Beth Baniszewski Madagascar

Great Tsingy
a beautiful photograph by

Beth Baniszewski

flickr.com/photos/bethtypeperson/

Country : Madagascar
Area : Great Tsingy

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After watching The Blue Planet, it was our dream to take our honeymoon to Madagascar. Our guide, Augustin, who we met at the Tsingy de Bemaraha said that, after reading National Geographic, it was his dream to visit America and see Yellowstone. I hope his dream comes true, too.



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Tsingy de Bemaraha National Park

http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Tsingy_de_Bemaraha_National_Park

The Tsingy de Bemaraha National Park is a national park located in Melaky Region, northwest Madagascar. The national park centers on two geological formations: the Great Tsingy and the Little Tsingy. Together with the adjacent Tsingy de Bemaraha Strict Nature Reserve, the National Park is a UNESCO World Heritage Site.[1][2]

The Tsingys are karstic plateaus in which groundwater has undercut the elevated uplands, and has gouged caverns and fissures into the limestone. Because of local conditions, the erosion is patterned vertically as well as horizontally. In several regions on western Madagascar, centering on this National Park and adjacent Nature Reserve, the superposition of vertical and horizontal erosion patterns has created dramatic "forests" of limestone needles.[1]

The word tsingy is indigenous to the Malagasy language as a description of the karst badlands of Madagascar. The word can be translated into English as where one cannot walk barefoot.[2]