world is beautiful . net
world is beautiful . net
loading

Kvalvika Beach photograph by Stefan Dinkel Norway

Kvalvika Beach
a beautiful photograph by

Stefan Dinkel

flickr.com/photos/stefandinkel/
b.riesel@icloud.com

Country : Norway
Area : Kvalvika Beach

Comments
This picture was taken with olympus OMD E-M1 and the Panasonic LUMIX G VARIO 7-14/F4.0, 11mm, f8, 40s. with Haida grey and graduated filter.



License and usage policy

All photographs hosted on worldisbeautiful.net servers are copyright by the original authors of that content. It is licensed only for personal use on computers, cellular phones, and other personal electronic devices. All other uses (whether or not for profit) including redistribution (with or without modification of the original work) is strictly prohibited by law without additional written permission by the copyright holder.

Moskenesøya

http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Moskenesøya

Moskenesøya (lit. Moskenes Island) is an island at the southern end of the Lofoten archipelago in Nordland county, Norway. The 186-square-kilometre (72 sq mi) island is located in the municipalities of Moskenes and Flakstad.[1]

The island consists of an agglomeration of glaciated hills with the highest peak being the 1,029-metre (3,376 ft) tall Hermannsdalstinden mountain.[2] It is elongated from southwest to northeast and it is about 40 kilometres (25 mi) long and 10 kilometres (6.2 mi) wide. It also has a very uneven shoreline. The island is connected to the nearby island of Flakstadøya by the Kåkern Bridge which is part of the European route E10 which ends on the Moskenesøya island at the village of Å.

There are many villages on the island. Flakstad municipality, on the northern part of the island, has several small villages including Fredvang, Selfjord, and Krystad. Moskenes municipality, on the southern part of the island, has the villages of Å, Hamnøy, Moskenes, Reine, Sakrisøy, Sørvågen, and Tind, all located on the eastern side of the island. There were settlements on the western coast, but the last ones were abandoned in 1950s owing to severe storms.[3]