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World's countries : South Africa

Blyde River Canyon
photograph by Chris van Kan

Blyde River Canyon

http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Blyde_River_Canyon

While it is difficult to compare canyons world-wide, Blyde River Canyon is one of the largest canyons on Earth, and it may be the largest 'green canyon' due to its lush subtropical foliage. It has some of the deepest precipitous cliffs of any canyon on the planet. It is the second largest canyon in Africa, after the Fish River Canyon, and is known as one of the great wonders of nature on the continent.

Possibly the best view in the whole of the Blyde River Canyon is of the "Three Rondavels", huge, round rocks, thought to be reminiscent of the houses or huts of the indigenous people, known as rondavels. This canyon is part of the Panorama route. This route starts at the town Graskop and includes God's Window, the Pinnacle and Bourke's Luck Potholes.

Cape of Good Hope
photograph by Noelbsb

Cape of Good Hope

http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Cape_of_Good_Hope

The Cape of Good Hope (Afrikaans: Kaap die Goeie Hoop [ˌkɑːp di ˌχujə ˈɦoə̯p], Dutch: Kaap de Goede Hoop [ˌkaːb də ˌɣudə ˈɦoːp],[1] Portuguese: Cabo da Boa Esperança [ˈkaβu ðɐ ˈβow.wɐ ʃpɨˈɾɐ̃sɐ]) is a rocky headland on the Atlantic coast of the Cape Peninsula, South Africa.

There is a misconception[citation needed] that the Cape of Good Hope is the southern tip of Africa, because it was once believed to be the dividing point between the Atlantic and Indian Oceans. In fact, the southernmost point is Cape Agulhas, about 150 kilometres (90 mi) to the east-southeast. The currents of the two oceans meet at the point where the warm-water Agulhas current meets the cold water Benguela current and turns back on itself—a point that fluctuates between Cape Agulhas and Cape Point (about 1.2 kilometers east of the Cape of Good Hope).

When following the western side of the African coastline from the equator, however, the Cape of Good Hope marks the point where a ship begins to travel more eastward than southward. Thus, the first modern rounding of the cape in 1488 by Portuguese explorer Bartolomeu Dias was a milestone in the attempts by the Portuguese to establish direct trade relations with the Far East (although Herodotus mentioned a claim that the Phoenicians had done so far earlier).[2] Dias called the cape Cabo das Tormentas ("Cape of Storms"), which was the original name of the "Cape of Good Hope".[3]

Coffee Bay
photograph by Kurt Böhi

Coffee Bay

http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Coffee_Bay

Coffee Bay (Afrikaans: Koffiebaai) is a small town situated on the Wild Coast of the Eastern Cape Province of South Africa. It is located about 250 kilometres south of the city of Durban[2] and has a population of 258 people.[3]

The town is named after the hundreds of coffee trees which grew from beans either scattered by a shipwreck or by plunderers.[4] A holiday resort in Tembuland is located 80km south-east of Viedgesville. It can be reached via a turn-off from the N2 highway.

The Mthatha River has its mouth near Coffee Bay.[5]

The Three Rondavels
photograph by Kok Leng Yeo

Blyde River Canyon Nature Reserve

http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Blyde_River_Canyon_Nature_Reserve

Blyde River Canyon Nature Reserve (or Motlatse Canyon Provincial Nature Reserve) is situated in the Drakensberg escarpment region of eastern Mpumalanga, South Africa. The reserve protects the Blyde River Canyon, including sections of the Ohrigstad and Blyde Rivers and the geological formations around Bourke's Luck Potholes, where the Treur River tumbles into the Blyde below. Southwards of the canyon, the reserve follows the escarpment, to include the Devil's and God's Window, the latter a popular viewpoint to the lowveld at the reserve's southern extremity.

The Mogologolo (1,794 m), Mariepskop (1,944 m) and Hebronberg (1,767 m) massifs are partially included in the reserve. Elevation varies from 560 m to 1,944 m above sea level.[1] Its resort areas are F.H. Odendaal and Swadeni, the latter only accessible from Limpopo province. The area of approximately 29,000 hectares (290 km2) is administered by the Mpumalanga Parks Board.[1]

This geological feature and day visitors' attraction, is situated at the confluence of the Treur and Blyde Rivers, on the reserve's western boundary 24°40′28″S 30°48′39″E / 24.67444°S 30.81083°E / -24.67444; 30.81083 (Bourke's Luck Potholes). The reserve's nature conservation headquarters is located here, beside the village of Moremela, at the canyon's southern, or upper reaches.