world is beautiful . net
world is beautiful . net
loading

World's countries : Scotland

Glen Coe
photograph by Alec Cheer

Glen Coe

http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Glen_Coe

Glen Coe (Scottish Gaelic: Gleann Comhann,[1]pronounced [klan̪ˠˈkʰo.ən̪ˠ]) is a glen of volcanic origins, in the Highlands of Scotland. It lies in the north of Argyll, close to the border with Lochaber. It is often considered one of the most spectacular and beautiful places in Scotland, and is a part of the designated National Scenic Area of Ben Nevis and Glen Coe. The narrow glen shows a grim grandeur. The glen, approaching from the east on the main A82 road, is surrounded by wild and precipitous mountains. Further west at Invercoe, the landscape has a softer beauty before the main entrance to the glen. The main settlement is the nearby village of Glencoe located at the foot of the glen. near the site of the 1692 Massacre of Glencoe.

The Glen is named after the River Coe which runs through it. The name of the river is believed to predate the Gaelic language and its meaning is not known. It is possible that the name stems from an individual personal name, Comhan (gen. Comhain).[2]

Isle of Skye
photograph by Rob Demel

Skye

http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Skye

Skye, or the Isle of Skye (/sk/; Scottish Gaelic: An t-Eilean Sgitheanach or Eilean a' Cheò), is the largest and northernmost of the major islands in the Inner Hebrides of Scotland.[Note 1] The island's peninsulas radiate from a mountainous centre dominated by the Cuillins, the rocky slopes of which provide some of the most dramatic mountain scenery in the country.[9][10] Although it has been suggested that the Gaelic Sgitheanach describes a winged shape there is no definitive agreement as to the name's origins.

The island has been occupied since the Mesolithic period, and its history includes a time of Norse rule and a long period of domination by Clan MacLeod and Clan Donald. The 18th century Jacobite risings led to the breaking up of the clan system and subsequent Clearances that replaced entire communities with sheep farms, some of which also involved forced emigrations to distant lands. Resident numbers declined from over 20,000 in the early 19th century to just under 9,000 by the closing decade of the 20th century. Skye's population increased by 4 per cent between 1991 and 2001.[11] About a third of the residents were Gaelic speakers in 2001, and although their numbers are in decline, this aspect of island culture remains important.[12]

The main industries are tourism, agriculture, fishing and forestry. Skye is part of the Highland Council local government area. The island's largest settlement is Portree, known for its picturesque harbour.[13] There are links to various nearby islands by ferry and, since 1995, to the mainland by a road bridge. The climate is mild, wet and windy. The abundant wildlife includes the golden eagle, red deer and Atlantic salmon. The local flora are dominated by heather moor, and there are nationally important invertebrate populations on the surrounding sea bed. Skye has provided the locations for various novels and feature films and is celebrated in poetry and song.

Loch Coruisk
photograph by Aidan Maccormick

Loch Coruisk

http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Loch_Coruisk

Loch Coruisk (in Scottish Gaelic, Coire Uisg, the "Cauldron of Waters") is an inland fresh-water loch, lying at the foot of the Black Cuillin in the Isle of Skye, in the Scottish Highlands.

Loch Coruisk is reputed to be the home of a water horse.[1]

Loch Lomond
photograph by Kieran Ions

Loch Lomond

http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Loch_Lomond

Loch Lomond (/ˈlɒxˈlmənd/; Scottish Gaelic Loch Laomainn) is a freshwater Scottish loch which crosses the Highland Boundary Fault. It is the largest inland stretch of water in Great Britain by surface area.[1] The loch contains many islands, including Inchmurrin, the largest fresh-water island in the British Isles.[2] Loch Lomond is a popular leisure destination and is featured in the song "The Bonnie Banks o' Loch Lomond".

Old Man of Storr
photograph by Dezzouk

The Storr

http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/The_Storr

The Storr (Scottish Gaelic: An Stòr)[1] is a rocky hill on the Trotternish peninsula of the Isle of Skye in Scotland. The hill presents a steep rocky eastern face overlooking the Sound of Raasay, contrasting with gentler grassy slopes to the west.

The Storr is prime example of the Trotternish landslip, the longest such feature in Great Britain. It is the type locality for the mineral gyrolite.[2]

The area in front of the cliffs of the Storr is known as the Sanctuary. This has a number of weirdly shaped rock pinnacles, the remnants of ancient landslips.