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World's countries : Norway

Besseggen
photograph by Lars Øverbø

Besseggen

http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Besseggen

The walk over Besseggen is one of the most popular mountain hikes in Norway. About 30,000 people walk this trip each year. The route over Besseggen starts at Gjendesheim, up to the trails highest point, Veslfjellet (1,743 m), down Besseggen, further over the relatively flat area Bandet (at the foot of Besshø), and ends at Memurubu, where one may take the regularly scheduled ferry route back to Gjendesheim. Many choose to do the hike in the other direction by starting at Memurubu after first taking the ferry there from Gjendesheim. The trip is estimated to take about 5–7 hours to walk without rest stops.

From Besseggen there is a great view over Gjende and Bessvatnet. One of the unique aspects of the view is that Gjende lies almost 400 m lower than Bessvatnet, and while Bessvatnet has a blue color typical of other lakes, Gjende has a distinct green color. The green color is the result from glacier runoff containing clay (rock flour). Looking down towards Memurubu one can see the nearby river Muru coloring the water with a light colored runoff.

Eikesdalsvatnet
photograph by Adelheid Smitt

Eikesdalsvatnet

http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Eikesdalsvatnet

Eikesdalsvatnet is a lake in Nesset Municipality in Møre og Romsdal county, Norway. The lake is long and narrow, roughly 18 kilometres (11 mi) in length, and it is the largest lake in Møre og Romsdal county. The village of Eikesdalen is located at the southern end of the lake.[1]

Its main inflows are the river Aura, flowing northwest from the lake Aursjøen, and the river Mardøla with the famous waterfall Mardalsfossen. The lake flows out through the River Eira which flows into the Eresfjorden. The lake is surrounded by 1,500-to-1,800-metre (4,900 to 5,900 ft) tall mountains like Juratinden and Fløtatinden.

Kvalvika Beach
photograph by Stefan Dinkel

Moskenesøya

http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Moskenesøya

Moskenesøya (lit. Moskenes Island) is an island at the southern end of the Lofoten archipelago in Nordland county, Norway. The 186-square-kilometre (72 sq mi) island is located in the municipalities of Moskenes and Flakstad.[1]

The island consists of an agglomeration of glaciated hills with the highest peak being the 1,029-metre (3,376 ft) tall Hermannsdalstinden mountain.[2] It is elongated from southwest to northeast and it is about 40 kilometres (25 mi) long and 10 kilometres (6.2 mi) wide. It also has a very uneven shoreline. The island is connected to the nearby island of Flakstadøya by the Kåkern Bridge which is part of the European route E10 which ends on the Moskenesøya island at the village of Å.

There are many villages on the island. Flakstad municipality, on the northern part of the island, has several small villages including Fredvang, Selfjord, and Krystad. Moskenes municipality, on the southern part of the island, has the villages of Å, Hamnøy, Moskenes, Reine, Sakrisøy, Sørvågen, and Tind, all located on the eastern side of the island. There were settlements on the western coast, but the last ones were abandoned in 1950s owing to severe storms.[3]

Lofoten Aurora
photograph by hpd-fotografy

Lofoten

http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Lofoten

Lofoten (Norwegian pronunciation: [ˈluːfuːtən]) is an archipelago and a traditional district in the county of Nordland, Norway. Lofoten is known for a distinctive scenery with dramatic mountains and peaks, open sea and sheltered bays, beaches and untouched lands. Though lying within the Arctic Circle, the archipelago experiences one of the world's largest elevated temperature anomalies relative to its high latitude.

Lofoten (Old Norse: Lófót) was originally the old name of the island Vestvågøya. The first element is (i.e., "lynx") and the last element is derived from Norse fótr (i.e., "foot"), as the shape of the island must have been compared with that of a lynx's foot. (The old name of the neighbouring island Flakstadøya was Vargfót, "wolf's foot", from vargr "wolf". See also Ofoten.)

"There is evidence of human settlement extending back at least 11,000 yrs in Lofoten, and the earliest archaeological sites ... are only about 5,500 yrs old, at the transition from the early to late Stone Age." Iron Age agriculture, livestock, and significant human habitation can be traced back to ~250 BCE.[1]

Nærøyfjord
photograph by Bent Inge

Nærøyfjord

http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Nærøyfjord

The Nærøyfjord (or Nærøyfjorden) is a fjord in the municipality of Aurland in Sogn og Fjordane, Norway. The narrow fjord is a branch of the large Sognefjord, and it is featured on the "Norway in a Nutshell" daytrips for tourists. The 18-kilometre (11 mi) long fjord is only 500 metres (1,600 ft) wide in some parts.[1]

The river Nærøydalselvi flows down the valley Nærøydalen into the fjord at the village of Gudvangen, near the highway E16. The village of Bakka and the Bakka church are located on the west shore of the fjord.

Since 2005, the Nærøyfjord has been listed as a UNESCO World Heritage Site. It has also been rated by the National Geographic Society as the world's number one natural heritage site along with the Geirangerfjord.

Rondane National Park
photograph by Ermedin Islamcevic

Rondane National Park

http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Rondane_National_Park

Rondane National Park (Norwegian: Rondane nasjonalpark) is the oldest national park in Norway, established on 21 December 1962.[1] The park contains ten peaks above 2,000 metres (6,560 ft), with the highest being Rondeslottet at an altitude of 2,178 m (7,146 ft). The park is an important habitat for herds of wild reindeer.

The park was extended in 2003, and now covers an area of 963 km2 (372 sq mi) in the counties Oppland and Hedmark. Rondane lies just to the east of Gudbrandsdal and two other mountain areas, Dovre and Jotunheimen are nearby.

Rondane is a typical high mountain area, with large plateaus and a total of ten peaks above 2,000 m (6,560 ft). The highest point is Rondeslottet ("The Rondane Castle") at an altitude of 2,178 m (7,146 ft). The lowest point is just below the tree line, which is approximately 1,000 to 1,100 m (about 3,300 to 3,600 ft) above sea level. The climate is mild but relatively arid. Apart from the White Birch trees of the lower areas, the soil and rocks are covered by heather and lichen, since they lack nutrients. The largest mountains are almost entirely barren; above 1,500 m (5,000 ft) nothing but the hardiest lichens grow on the bare stones.

Seven Sisters waterfall
photograph by Kenny Drew

Seven Sisters Waterfall, Norway

http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Seven_Sisters_Waterfall,_Norway

The Seven Sisters (Norwegian: De Syv Søstrene or Dei Sju Systrene, also known as Knivsflåfossen) is the 39th tallest waterfall in Norway. The waterfall consists of seven separate streams, and the tallest of the seven has a free fall that measures 250 metres (820 ft).

The waterfall is located along the Geirangerfjorden in Stranda Municipality in Møre og Romsdal county, Norway. The waterfall is located just south of the historic Knivsflå farm, across the fjord from the old Skageflå farm. The falls are about 6.5 kilometres (4.0 mi) west of the village of Geiranger. It is part of the Geiranger World Heritage Site.

"The Seven Sisters" (Norwegian: De Syv Søstrene or Dei Sju Systrene) is located on the northern side of the Geirangerfjorden, and directly across the fjord lies a single waterfall called "The Suitor" (Norwegian: Friaren). The legend of the seven sisters is that they dance playfully down the mountain. Meanwhile, across the fjord, the suitor (or courter) flirts playfully with them from afar.[1][2]

Troll Wall
photograph by Peter Bailey

Troll Wall

http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Troll_Wall

The Troll Wall (Norwegian: Trollveggen) is part of the mountain massif Trolltindene (Troll Peaks) in the Romsdalen valley, near Åndalsnes and Molde, on the Norwegian west coast. Trollveggen is part of the Reinheimen National Park in the municipality of Rauma in Møre og Romsdal county. The Troll Wall is the tallest vertical rock face in Europe, about 1,100 metres (3,600 ft) from its base to the summit of its highest point. At its steepest, the summit ridge overhangs the base of the wall by nearly 50 metres (160 ft). The Rauma River and the European Route E136 runs just to the east of the wall.[1]

The rock is gneiss, formed into a broken rock wall of huge corners, concave roofs, and crack systems, topped with a series of spires and pinnacles on the summit rim. The rock is generally loose, and rockfall is the norm on this north-facing big wall. There was a series of large rockfalls on the wall in September 1998, radically changing the character of several climbing routes.[2]

The Troll Wall has been a prestigious goal for climbers and base jumpers alike. Carl Boenish, the "father" of base jumping, was killed on the Troll Wall in 1984 shortly after setting the world record for the highest base jump in history. Base jumping from Troll Wall has been illegal since 1986.