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World's countries : Iceland

Dyrhólaey
photograph by Corey Layman

Dyrhólaey

http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Dyrhólaey

The small peninsula, or promontory, Dyrhólaey (0.192 Miles / 120 meters) (formerly known as "Cape Portland" by seamen)[1] is located on the south coast of Iceland, not far from the village Vík. It was formerly an island of volcanic origin, which is also known by the Icelandic word eyja meaning island.

The view from Dyrhólaey is interesting: To the north is to be seen the big glacier Mýrdalsjökull. To the east, the black lava columns of the Reynisdrangar come out of the sea, and to the west the whole coastline in the direction of Selfoss is visible - depending on weather conditions. In front of the peninsula, there is a gigantic black arch of lava standing in the sea, which gave the peninsula its name (meaning: the hill-island with the door-hole).

In the summertime, many puffins nest on the cliff faces of Dyrhólaey.

Kvernufoss waterfall
photograph by Fernando Reguera

Skógar

http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Skógar

Skógar (pronounced [ˈskou.ar]), literally forests, is a small Icelandic village with a population of roughly 25 located at the south of the Eyjafjallajökull glacier, in the municipality of Rangárþing eystra.

The area is known for its waterfall, Skógafoss, on the Skógá river, which springs from 60 metres at the top of an eroded cliff. At Skógar is a folk museum, Skógasafn, open daily, all the year, as well as a museum on transport in Iceland.

Not far from Skógar is the Kvernufoss fall. Further upstream on the Skógá river there are many other spectacular falls. While climbing in the small forest behind the old school, some ruins of old farms can be seen and easily accessed.

Landmannalaugar
photograph by Alexander Garin

Landmannalaugar

http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Landmannalaugar

Landmannalaugar (Icelandic pronunciation: [ˈlan̥tmanːaˌløiɣar̥]) is a place in the Fjallabak Nature Reserve [1] in the Highlands of Iceland. It is at the edge of Laugahraun lava field, which was formed in an eruption around the year 1477.[2] It is known for its natural geothermal hot springs and surrounding landscape.

Landmannalaugar is the northern end of the Laugarvegur hiking trail and a popular destination for tourists traveling in Iceland. The Iceland Touring Association operates a mountain hut with sleeping bag accommodation for 75 people and a public toilet with showers.[3] During the tourist high season there is also a small shop there that sells coffee and basic groceries, a horse tour agency. ICE-SAR highland patrol in Fjallabak operates from here. Several bus companies have regular trips to and from Landmannalaugar during the tourist season.

Four routes lead to Landmannalaugar and one of them is accessible by regular car, though the road is rough (stones the size of fists are not uncommon as well as washing-board[clarification needed] style sections of the road). Rented cars are not allowed on either road as F roads are usually only intended for 4WD vehicles. The easiest route to Landmannalaugar is to take either Road 30 from the main road and change into Road 32, cross the Sultartangi hydro-electric dam, going onto F26, then F208 and just before arriving in Landmannalaugar, making a right turn to F224. Road 26 can also be accessed directly from Rd. 1 just before arriving in the small village of Hella, crossing through typical Icelandic farmland landscape. There are also roads leading to Landmannalaugar from the east via Eldgjá or the north via Sprengisandur, both 4WD roads only.

Seljalandsfoss
photograph by Christian Abend

Seljalandsfoss

http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Seljalandsfoss

Seljalandsfoss is one of the best known waterfalls in Iceland.[1] Seljalandsfoss is situated between Selfoss and Skógafoss, where Route 1 (the Ring Road) meets the track going to Þórsmörk.

This waterfall of the river Seljalandsá drops 60 metres (200 ft) over the cliffs of the former coastline. It is possible to walk behind the waterfall.

It was a waypoint during the first leg of The Amazing Race 6.

Thórsmörk
photograph by Jonatan Pie

Thórsmörk

http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Thórsmörk

Thórsmörk (Icelandic: Þórsmörk,  [listen] ) is a mountain ridge in Iceland that was named after the Norse god Thor (Þór). It is situated in the south of Iceland between the glaciers Tindfjallajökull and Eyjafjallajökull. The name "Thórsmörk" properly refers only to the mountain ridge between the rivers Krossá, Þröngá, and Markarfljót,[1] but is sometimes used informally to describe a wider area that includes the region between Thórsmörk and Eyjafjallajökull. Thórsmörk is one of the most popular hiking areas in Iceland.[2]

In the valley, the river Krossá winds between the mountains. The valley is closed in between glaciers, Mýrdalsjökull being at the rear end of the valley. This leads to an especially warm climate, better than in the rest of south Iceland. In the protected valley, green vegetation of moss, fern, birchwood, and other small shrubs are found.

Thórsmörk is popular amongst hikers. Many different tours are possible, from hiking on the glaciers to trekking (i.e., Laugavegur up to Landmannalaugar) or smaller excursions, such as to the canyon Stakkholtsgjá with its waterfall or five small day treks, to the summits of surrounding peaks, with rewarding views, even in bad weather. The Krossá is a cold, fast river coming down from glaciers; a bridge allows pedestrians to cross. Coaches arrive daily from Reykjavík and other towns in Iceland.

Vestra Horn
photograph by David Frey

Vatnajökull National Park

http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Vatnajökull_National_Park

Vatnajökull National Park is one of three national parks in Iceland. It encompasses all of Vatnajökull glacier and extensive surrounding areas. These include the national parks previously existing at Skaftafell in the southwest and Jökulsárgljúfur in the north.

In general, national parks are protected areas which are considered unique because of their nature or cultural heritage. The unique qualities of Vatnajökull National Park are primarily its great variety of landscape features, created by the combined forces of rivers, glacial ice, and volcanic and geothermal activity.